WHAT IS TELEHEALTH?

WHAT MEASURES ARE WE TAKING

Telehealth is the use of video conferencing technology on a computer or smart phone to provide a clinical or fitness consultation.

It is simple to use, and we will supply you with the simple steps to get started with your appointment. This means you can still receive the care you deserve without putting yourself or others at risk.

But will I miss out by not having a face-to-face appointment?

Luckily, science has informed us of several other strategies that are more powerful in getting people moving forward in their recovery that don’t require hands-on therapies like dry-needling, acupuncture, massage, or manipulation (1-4).

In fact, although those strategies can give some relief and can have some benefits, we now know they are not the treatments that help people to recover in the long-term. We also know that video sessions are just as effective as face-to-face sessions (5).

Our services are not based around these types of treatments, rather we work with you and your very unique experience to find strategies to get you back to what you love doing. This is always individual, but they are things you can do yourself with as much support from us as you need during your journey.  

We are also able to provide consultations for other health issues (such as cardiovascular, metabolic, neurological and neurological conditions), and provide exercise and movement advice to ensure you manage your condition effectively.

How do I find out more or book an appointment?

If you would like to know more about our video options, and how we can help you to continue on your health journey during these times of social isolation and worry, then we would love to hear from you.

The coronavirus does not mean you have to put your recovery on hold!

To find out more, you can get in touch by either calling 1300 920 520 or emailing info@thebiomechanics.com.au

References

(1)  Lin, I., Wiles, L., Waller, R., Goucke, R., Nagree, Y., Gibberd, M., ... & O’Sullivan, P. P. (2020). What does best practice care for musculoskeletal pain look like? Eleven consistent recommendations from high-quality clinical practice guidelines: systematic review. British journal of sports medicine, 54(2), 79-86.

(2)   National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). (2014) Osteoarthritis: care and management (CG177). London: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

(3)  Bernstein, I. A., Malik, Q., Carville, S., & Ward, S. (2017). Low back pain and sciatica: summary of NICE guidance. Bmj, 356.

(4)  Côté, P., Wong, J. J., Sutton, D., Shearer, H. M., Mior, S., Randhawa, K., ... & Lindsay, G. M. (2016). Management of neck pain and associated disorders: A clinical practice guideline from the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration. European Spine Journal, 25(7), 2000-2022.

(5) Cottrell, M. A., Galea, O. A., O’Leary, S. P., Hill, A. J., & Russell, T. G. (2017). Real-time telerehabilitation for the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions is effective and comparable to standard practice: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Clinical rehabilitation, 31(5), 625-638.

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WE WOULD LIKE TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE BOON WURRUNG AND WURUNDJERI PEOPLES OF THE KULIN NATIONS WHO ARE THE CUSTODIANS OF THE LAND ON WHICH WE GATHER. WE PAY OUT RESPECTS TO THEIR ELDERS, PAST, PRESENT AND EMERGING.